Voicing support for law enforcement

This vintage typwriter is our featured image.

Anyone who has followed this blog for any length of times knows that I am unashamed and unapologetic when it comes to my support for law enforcement.

I simply cannot, do not, and will never buy into the politically correct, liberal, media-driven narrative that most American cops are violent, racist, subhuman creatures who are running amok with impunity.

Alexandra Bogdanovic
Founder/owner of In Brief Legal Writing Services, Alexandra Bogdanovic. Photo by N. Bogdanovic

Having said that, my support is not unconditional, nor is it given blindly. As a former crime reporter, I am fully aware of the abuses perpetrated by some police officers. As I have said before — and will no doubt say again — any police officer who engages in racism or otherwise abuses their authority should be punished to the fullest extent of the law.

Apparently I am not alone.

Earlier this month I came across an article about an Indiana man who is also voicing his support for law enforcement. His name is Craig B. Moore, and he recently wrote a song called Thin Blue Line.

Proceeds from downloads on iTunes, Google Play and Amazon will be used to benefit the families of slain law enforcement officers and fund regional law enforcement programs. Specifically, the money will go to the Indiana Chapter of C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors), the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department and the Rush County Sheriff’s Department.

The proceeds designated for the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department and Rush County Sheriff’s Department will be used for each agency’s K-9 program.

Moore’s goal is to raise $10,000 for the organizations.

As he told an Indiana TV station, “I hope that this reaches a lot of people and helps provide some sort of comfort to them.” Moore also said he wants the police to know how most Americans feel about them.  He explained that he wrote the song in order to  “provide the message that they’re our heroes, they’re out there to protect all of us day and night and they work hard to do that.”

Moore got the idea for the song after his brother-in-law — who works for the Rush County Sheriff’s Department — wrote to him this summer. According to Moore’s brother-in-law, Joshua Brinson, the letter was basically a “one page kind of an essay based on a fallen officers funeral and what goes through with all of that.”

Brinson reportedly wrote the letter after five officers were killed in Dallas over the summer.

He then sent it to Moore.

“It affects all of us that wears the uniform, but more importantly, it affects the families and that’s kind of how I looked at that,” said Brinson.

To say it’s been a rough year for American law enforcement is a bit of an understatement. There’s been too much sadness, too much loss, too much fear, too much mistrust, and too much ignorant rhetoric.

And in a year when the people who have screamed the loudest and engaged in the most hateful rhetoric have dominated the news, it’s nice to hear that someone has actually raised his voice for a good cause.

Thanks, Craig.

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Blue lives matter bill puts things in perspective

This vintage typwriter is our featured image.

Yesterday this country lost a true hero.

A man went to work and never came home.

And now somewhere a family grieves. A wife is now a widow. Three children no longer have a father.

But there are no protests. There is no national media coverage and there is no national outrage — because Ronald Tarentino Jr. was a cop.

Officer Down

His death is summed up in a few brief paragraphs on the Officer Down Memorial Page website. Here’s what happened. Tarentino, an officer with the Auburn Police Department in Massachusetts for two years, made a traffic stop shortly after midnight. As he approached the vehicle, someone inside (allegedly) pulled a gun and killed him in cold blood.

“The subject who shot him fled the scene, but was later located at an Oxford apartment building,” the synopsis on the ODMP website says. “As officers searched the apartment he was believed to have been hiding in they discovered a secret passage into an adjoining apartment. When the officers made entry into the second apartment the subject exited a closet and opened fire, wounding one Massachusetts State Police tactical team trooper before being killed.”

Tarentino — who had previously served on the Leicester Police Department — was just 42.

Grim Statistics

Tarentino was the second law enforcement officer to die in the line of duty in Massachusetts this year. In all, 38 American police officers have died in the line of duty so far this year. Of those, 19, including Tarentino, died after being shot. The number of officers killed by gunfire so far this year represents a 46 percent increase compared to the same time period in 2015.

Black and white photograph of New York Police Department barriers taken by Alexandra Bogdanovic
NYPD barriers. Photo by Alexandra Bogdanovic

Danville, Ohio Police Officer Thomas Cottrell — the first officer killed in the line of duty this year — was also the first to die after being shot. According to information on the ODMP website, the person who surprised him behind a local building was targeting police officers.

“At approximately 11:20 pm (January 17) dispatchers received a call from a female subject stating that police officers in Danville were in danger,” according to the synopsis on odmp.org. “She stated her ex-boyfriend was armed and intended to kill a police officer.”

When Cottrell did not respond to radio transmissions, law enforcement personnel organized and initiated a coordinated search. Searchers found Cottrell’s body a short while later and an ensuing manhunt resulted in the apprehension of the alleged perpetrator.

At just 34, Cottrell worked in law enforcement for more than a decade. He his survived by his parents, stepmother, several siblings and three children.

The Blue Lives Matter Bill

According to various media accounts, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards could soon sign a bill that would make attacking a police officer, firefighter or paramedic in that state a hate crime.

Apparently this doesn’t sit well with a lot of people — most of whom probably have no problem admitting they hate cops.

Personally, I think it’s great. Because as far as I’m concerned, all lives matter.