Scams, schemes, lies and a lawsuit of epic proportions

This vintage typwriter is our featured image.

At this point I’m not sure who I’ll sue. But I’m going to sue someone. I may even sue a whole bunch of people. And if I have my way, it will be a lawsuit of epic proportions.

But then again, I’m getting a bit ahead of myself. So let me start from the beginning.

Alexandra Bogdanovic
Founder/owner of In Brief Legal Writing Services, Alexandra Bogdanovic. Photo by N. Bogdanovic

To start with, I don’t want to be sued myself. So I can’t name the parties involved in this case. Let’s just call them Company X, Company Y and Company Z.

As I may have mentioned in a prior post, we enlisted the services of Company X in connection with our kitchen renovations earlier this summer. Because Company X is an international conglomeration with a very good reputation, we were confident the project would be completed promptly, on budget and to our satisfaction.

Little did we know…

At any rate, Company X referred us to Company Y, which we paid for general contracting services. We also paid sub-contractors to do the rough plumbing and electrical work, which all went according to plan. We were totally happy… until we phoned the Town Hall to see when the inspections for the rough plumbing and electrical had been scheduled — and found out they weren’t.

So we reached out to Company Y to see what was going on. Phone calls went unanswered. E-mails weren’t returned. A dumpster partially filled with construction debris sat in our driveway.

This went on for weeks.

Finally, we heard from one of our sub-contractors, who called for an update. Without going into too many details, he told us that there was some huge kerfuffle with Company Y — and that we should go ahead and schedule the inspections for the completed work ourselves. So we did.

The inspections went smoothly, but we still couldn’t get a hold of anyone from Company Y. So we got in touch with Company X and they referred us to Company Z. Company Z gave us detailed information about Company Y, and suggested we take legal action against them. Company Z also promised to “make things right” and help us get our project back on schedule.

A week or so after our initial conversation with someone from Company Z, another representative came to meet us in person and assess the status of our project. Based on that conversation, we thought everything would be okay. That was a month ago.

Fast forward to today, when we finally called our attorney to schedule a time to talk about this and then called Company Y to let them know what we’d done. Much to our surprise, someone from Company Y called us back — and told us everything we’d heard from Company Z is a pack of lies.

So we’ll meet with the representative from Company Y next week.

In the meantime, the project that started in June and was supposed to take six to eight weeks is still on hold.

And it’s almost October…

Any absolute stance on transgender bathroom rights is pointless

This vintage typwriter is our featured image.

“This action is about a great deal more than just bathrooms.  This is about the dignity and respect we accord our fellow citizens, and the laws that we, as a people and as a country, have enacted to protect them – indeed, to protect all of us.”  — Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch.

With all due respect, Ms. Lynch — you just don’t get it. Oh, I’m sure you mean well. But you’re deeply misguided at best. At worst, you’re an absolute idiot.

Having said that, you are right about one thing. The current transgender bathroom law debate is about much more than bathrooms.

But that’s it. You’re completely wrong about everything else.

You see the question isn’t whether transgender people should be treated fairly. Of course they should. That goes without saying. The question isn’t whether transgender people should be allowed to have access to public restrooms  matching the gender with which they self-identify. Of course they should. That goes without saying, too.

The question is how to accommodate the transgender population’s needs without infringing on the rights afforded to the rest of us. The question is how to educate and inform the general public about the transgender population’s needs without lecturing or bullying them. The question is how to let people who disagree with transgender bathroom laws express their opinions without disparaging them and calling them names.

Here’s a hint. Swapping lawsuits with North Carolina is not the answer. After all, litigation is an adversarial process.

Don’t Get Me Wrong…

Clearly there’s no place for hatred in a civilized society. Clearly we need laws to discourage people from acting on hatred and punishing them when they do. Clearly we need to enforce them. Clearly we also need laws in place to protect and ensure the fair treatment of minorities.

Alexandra Bogdanovic
Founder/owner of In Brief Legal Writing Services, Alexandra Bogdanovic. Photo by N. Bogdanovic

But as I have said before, lawmakers and politicians can’t force anyone to understand something they have difficulty grasping. You can’t force anyone to change their beliefs. You can’t force anyone to have an open mind if they’re not so inclined. And you can’t make anyone stop being afraid of something they truly fear.

The more you try, the more the person or people you are trying to influence will cling to their beliefs. The more you try, the more the person or person are trying to influence will resent it. The more you judge and resort to self-righteousness, the more they will resort to anger and hate.

If you don’t believe me, just take a good, hard look at the people who support the so-called bathroom laws.

There’s Got To Be A Better Way

As far as I am concerned, there’s got to be a better way. It would be fantastic if we could all sit down and have a calm, rational, adult conversation. It would be awesome if we could all express our views in a healthy manner — without resorting to name-calling and vitriol. It would be wonderful if we could all learn to respect each other’s differences, even if we don’t understand them.

But judging by what’s going on in America today, I guess that’s just wishful thinking…